Building Permits

 

 Apply for a Permit

Greater Napanee's Development Services will assist with all Building Permit Applications.

Applications for a Permit to Construct (Sewage System Applications not included) can be submitted by;

or

  • To: Town of Greater Napanee Building Department, 45 Commercial Court, Napanee ON K7R 4A2 by mail, Front door drop box or in person 

NOTE: Due to the high volume of applications and related inquiries received daily, we are unable to save or track incomplete applications. We ask that all applications be submitted in their entirety, accompanied by required documentation once collected.

Deck Permit Application 

You must fill out a Deck Permit Application before doing any of the following:

  • Construct a new deck attached to a house
  • Construct a free-standing deck that exceeds 10 square metres (108 sq. ft.)
  • Replace an existing deck
  • Addition to an existing deck 
 Demolition Permit 
 

You must fill out a Demolition Permit Application before doing any of the following:

  • Demolition of a building 
Dwelling Permit 

You must fill out a Dwelling Permit Application before doing any of the following: 

  • Construct a dwelling
  • Construct an addition to an existing dwelling

Radon for Dwellings and Additions:

 Radon Gas Mitigation Strategy
 

Due to recent findings from a study conducted by Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington (KFL&A) Public Heath, the Town of Greater Napanee is implementing soil gas control measures in new construction and additions of low-rise residential buildings.

The strategy applies to all building permits applied for after November 1, 2019.

Please note that the radon mitigation strategy does not contain provisions for existing buildings. The Ontario Building Code regulates new construction only and does not contain retrofit requirements for radon gas. As a result, the strategy is only able to address radon gas mitigation in new construction.

Owners of existing buildings should contact KFL&A Public Health, Health Canada or Tarion to learn more about the health effects of radon gas, or to learn more about their options for radon gas testing and mitigation.

What is radon gas?

Radon is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas that is formed naturally by the radioactive breakdown of uranium contained in soil and rock. Radon usually escapes from the ground into the air where it mixes with fresh air resulting in concentrations too low to be of concern. However, when radon enters an enclosed space through cracks and holes in floors and foundations in a building, it can accumulate to higher concentrations.

Canada’s radon guideline is currently 200 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3), and Health Canada guidelines dictate that radon gas concentrations above 200 Bq/m3 require remediation.

Radon gas in Lennox and Addington

Recent results from residential surveys completed by KFL&A Public Health released August 12, 2019 indicate 23.5 per cent of the 227 randomly tested buildings within Lennox and Addington exceed Canada’s recommended guideline for radon gas of 200 Bq/m3.

Radon gas testing

All radon gas testing will consist of long-term tests (minimum 91 days) completed during the winter season, between October and April, when windows and doors are generally closed, and are recommended to be carried out by a Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) certified professional.

You will need to purchase a testing device and place it in your basement or lowest occupied floor level the first winter after occupancy. Testing kits can be dropped off at KFL&A Public Health or sent back to the company directly using pre-paid postage. You should then receive your test results approximately 2 weeks from when it was sent in.

Depending on the soil gas control option chosen by the builder, the building may be subject to mandatory or voluntary radon gas testing requirements. Although all new homes are not subject to mandatory testing, Health Canada recommends that all buildings be tested for radon gas.

It is the owner’s responsibility to have the mandatory radon test conducted and submit the results to Greater Napanee’s Building Department

Test results

Where mandatory radon gas testing results come back over 200 Bq/m3, the building owner will be responsible for remediation work.

All new homes in Ontario come with a new home warranty that is provided by your builder and backed by Tarion. This warranty also covers excessive radon gas levels in new homes for seven years from the date of occupancy.

New Homes and Residential Additions

As part of the Radon Gas Mitigation Strategy, all new construction and additions to low-rise residential dwellings will require soil gas control measures in compliance with 9.13.4., and SB-9 of the Ontario Building Code.

The Soil Gas Mitigation Strategy document provides an explanation of each of the three options below:

Options for new home owners

If your builder chooses Option 1, the builder or their representative should point out the radon gas pipe on your pre-delivery inspection (PDI). It will be a white pipe sticking out of the foundation labeled “soil gas pipe”, to differentiate it from a bathroom waste pipe. You should ask your representative to explain how the testing works before the PDI is over.

If your mandatory test comes back above 200 Bq/m3, then the builder will be responsible for remediation work. Generally, this will include extending the radon pipe in your basement up through the house and venting it through the exterior with a fan. Every home and situation is different, so remediation work may vary. If the results come back below 200 Bq/m3, you have the option of whether or not you choose to remediate.

If the builder chooses Options 2 or 3, where voluntary testing results come back over 200 Bq/m3, the owner should contact their builder and Tarion Home Warranty to determine next steps. Generally, the remedial measures will include breaking the concrete and adding a pipe that vents radon gas out of the building. Price and type of remediation differs for every home. Again, if the results come back below 200 Bq/m3, you have the option of whether or not you choose to mitigate.

When building a home you can also request the builder select a different option if you would prefer. The builder probably needs to know before permits are applied for as the rough in will be completed around the time the foundation is poured.

Radon Gas Soil Mitigation Construction Requirements

Due to recent findings from a study conducted by Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington (KFL&A) Public Health, the Town of Greater Napanee is implementing soil gas control measures in new construction and additions of low-rise residential buildings. This strategy applies to new building permits applied for after November 1, 2019.

Health Canada guidelines dictate that radon gas concentrations above 200 Becquerel’s per cubic metre (Bq/m3) require remediation. As such, this strategy requires soil gas control requirements as per the Ontario Building Code (OBC) subsection 9.13.4., and SB-9 (Requirements for Soil Gas Control). 

Construction Requirements

Building permit drawings shall clearly indicate details associated with one of the following three radon gas mitigation options to be constructed on site:

Option 1
1. A 100mm diameter PVC pipe rough-in through the floor slab adjacent an exterior wall connected to a corrugated plastic soil gas pipe extending under the slab and terminating at or near the center in conformance with Subsection 3.2, Sentences (1) through (5) of SB-9,
     a. Minimum 150mm granular material for a radius not less than 300mm centered on the pipe, with the bottom of the
     pipe open to the granular, and
     b. The upper end of the pipe shall be provided with a removable seal, and labeled to indicate for “soil gas removal
     only”.
2. Mandatory radon gas testing in conformance with Subsection 3.2, Sentence (6) of SB-9.

Please note: where concentration levels exceed 200 Bq/m3, a subsoil depressurization system is to be installed in conformance with Subsection 3.2, sentence (9) of SB-9.


Option 1: Sub-Slab depressurization rough-in

sub slab depressurization rough in

*Please note that we are working towards making our website images accessible.

 

Option 2
1. A soil gas barrier on the foundation walls (bituminous damp proofing) in conformance with Division B, 9.13.4.2 (3), and
2. under the basement floor slab using 6 mil polyethylene lapped not less than 300mm in conformance with Figures SB-9A or SB-9B of SB-9, and
3. sealing along the perimeter of the basement floor slab and at all penetrations using flexible sealant (polyurethane caulking) in conformance with Division B, 9.13.4.2.(4)(a) and SB-9.

Please note: spray foam can be substituted as a radon gas barrier under basement floor slabs where installed in conformance with CCMC Evaluation Report 14073-R.

 

Option 3
1. A soil gas barrier on the foundation walls (bituminous damp proofing) in conformance with Division B, Sentence 9.13.4.2 (3) and Figure SB-9A or SB-9B of SB-9.
2. Installation of a sub slab depressurization system installed in accordance with Health Canada guideline "Reducing Radon Levels in Existing Homes: A Canadian Guide for Professional Contractors".
     a. A properly labelled 100mm PVC pipe shall be installed through the floor slab adjacent an exterior wall connected to
     a corrugated plastic soil gas pipe extending under the slab into a centrally located 150mm thick bed of granular
     material. In accordance with Subsection 3.2, sentences (1) through (5) of SB-9, and
     b. Above the slab, 100mm grey PVC piping shall be installed, extending either through the roof or the rim joist, and
     shall have a continuous duty centrifugal inline radon fan.
Please note: where an ICF foundation is being used, and radon option 2 or 3 is chosen, replace “bituminous damp proofing” with “waterproofing membrane” approved for installation over ICF foundations.

Option 2 and 3: Damp Proofing and Soil Gas Control at floor and wall junctions

damp proofing and soil gas control and floor and wall junctions

SB-9A - Solid Wall                                 SB-9B - Hollow Wall

*Please note that we are working towards making our website images accessible.

Required Inspections

The owner of a property on which construction takes place or their authorized agent shall arrange for the following inspections:
1. The installation of the rough-in soil gas pipe, and granular material prior to pouring the basement slab,
2. The installation of soil gas barrier on foundation wall (bituminous damp proofing) and under floor slab (6 mil polyethylene) prior to covering or pouring the basement slab, and
3. Sealing of the perimeter of the slab adjacent to the foundation wall and any slab penetrations (polyurethane caulking) prior to covering.
4. Pipe cap and labelling, and inline fan (where required) prior to occupancy.

Testing

Depending on the radon gas mitigation option chosen by the builder, the building may be subject to mandatory radon gas testing.
It is the Owners responsibility to conduct the radon test to determine the radon concentration in the building and submit the results to the Greater Napanee’s Building Department.
All radon testing will consist of long-term tests (minimum 91 days) completed during the winter season, when windows and doors are generally closed, and are recommended to be carried out by a Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) certified professional.

Testing Results and Mitigation

The following is required where mandatory radon gas testing results come back over 200 Becquerel’s per cubic metre (Bq/m3):
1. The Owner is responsible for mitigation and installation of a subfloor depressurization system.
2. Measures shall be taken to ensure that any resultant decrease in soil temperature will not adversely affect the foundation, and documentation to this affect is to be provided by a qualified person.
After installation, the Owner is to submit testing results indicating levels below 200 Becquerel’s to Greater Napanee’s Building Department.
Health Canada recommends that you hire a professional certified under the Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) as lowering radon levels in a home requires specific technical knowledge and skills to ensure the job is done properly. To find a list of certified professionals contact the Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) at 1-855-722-6777.

Tarion Warranty

New homes in Ontario come with a new home warranty that is provided by your builder and backed by Tarion. This warranty also covers excessive radon gas levels in new homes for seven years from the date of occupancy.

 Soil Gas Mitigation Strategy Declaration Form 
 Soil Gas Mitigation Strategy Declaration Form 
General Building Permit 

You must fill out a General Building Permit Application before doing any of the following:

  • Construct a new building over 10 square metres (107 sq. ft.)
  • Replace an existing deck or add a roof to an existing deck
  • Renovate, repair or add to any building including porches, decks and garages
  • Change a building's use (e.g. warehouse to banquet facility)
  • Install, change or remove load-bearing walls (structural work)
  • Make new openings for or enlarge existing doors and windows
  • Build a garage, balcony, deck, roof or enclose an existing deck
  • Work completed on a foundation and drainage system
  • Install or modify and life safety or fire suppression system, such as fire alarms, sprinkler or standpipe or fixed extinguishing systems
  • Install or modify heating, plumbing, air conditioning systems, fireplaces, fireplace inserts and woodstoves
  • Install or renovate plumbing
  • Construct or reconstruct a chimney
  • Finish a basement or convert a room into a bedroom
  • Erect temporary buildings (including tents over 60 square metres)
  • Solar panels attached to a roof 
  • Installation of insultation and/or vapour barrier

Radon for Dwellings and Additions:

 Radon Gas Mitigation Strategy
 

Due to recent findings from a study conducted by Kingston, Frontenac Lennox and Addington (KFL&A) Public Heath, the Town of Greater Napanee is implementing soil gas control measures in new construction and additions of low-rise residential buildings.

The strategy applies to all building permits applied for after November 1, 2019.

Please note that the radon mitigation strategy does not contain provisions for existing buildings. The Ontario Building Code regulates new construction only and does not contain retrofit requirements for radon gas. As a result, the strategy is only able to address radon gas mitigation in new construction.

Owners of existing buildings should contact KFL&A Public Health, Health Canada or Tarion to learn more about the health effects of radon gas, or to learn more about their options for radon gas testing and mitigation.

What is radon gas?

Radon is a colourless, odourless and tasteless gas that is formed naturally by the radioactive breakdown of uranium contained in soil and rock. Radon usually escapes from the ground into the air where it mixes with fresh air resulting in concentrations too low to be of concern. However, when radon enters an enclosed space through cracks and holes in floors and foundations in a building, it can accumulate to higher concentrations.

Canada’s radon guideline is currently 200 becquerels per cubic metre (Bq/m3), and Health Canada guidelines dictate that radon gas concentrations above 200 Bq/m3 require remediation.

Radon gas in Lennox and Addington

Recent results from residential surveys completed by KFL&A Public Health released August 12, 2019 indicate 23.5 per cent of the 227 randomly tested buildings within Lennox and Addington exceed Canada’s recommended guideline for radon gas of 200 Bq/m3.

Radon gas testing

All radon gas testing will consist of long-term tests (minimum 91 days) completed during the winter season, between October and April, when windows and doors are generally closed, and are recommended to be carried out by a Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) certified professional.

You will need to purchase a testing device and place it in your basement or lowest occupied floor level the first winter after occupancy. Testing kits can be dropped off at KFL&A Public Health or sent back to the company directly using pre-paid postage. You should then receive your test results approximately 2 weeks from when it was sent in.

Depending on the soil gas control option chosen by the builder, the building may be subject to mandatory or voluntary radon gas testing requirements. Although all new homes are not subject to mandatory testing, Health Canada recommends that all buildings be tested for radon gas.

It is the owner’s responsibility to have the mandatory radon test conducted and submit the results to Greater Napanee’s Building Department

Test results

Where mandatory radon gas testing results come back over 200 Bq/m3, the building owner will be responsible for remediation work.

All new homes in Ontario come with a new home warranty that is provided by your builder and backed by Tarion. This warranty also covers excessive radon gas levels in new homes for seven years from the date of occupancy.

New Homes and Residential Additions

As part of the Radon Gas Mitigation Strategy, all new construction and additions to low-rise residential dwellings will require soil gas control measures in compliance with 9.13.4., and SB-9 of the Ontario Building Code.

The Soil Gas Mitigation Strategy document provides an explanation of each of the three options below:

Options for new home owners

If your builder chooses Option 1, the builder or their representative should point out the radon gas pipe on your pre-delivery inspection (PDI). It will be a white pipe sticking out of the foundation labeled “soil gas pipe”, to differentiate it from a bathroom waste pipe. You should ask your representative to explain how the testing works before the PDI is over.

If your mandatory test comes back above 200 Bq/m3, then the builder will be responsible for remediation work. Generally, this will include extending the radon pipe in your basement up through the house and venting it through the exterior with a fan. Every home and situation is different, so remediation work may vary. If the results come back below 200 Bq/m3, you have the option of whether or not you choose to remediate.

If the builder chooses Options 2 or 3, where voluntary testing results come back over 200 Bq/m3, the owner should contact their builder and Tarion Home Warranty to determine next steps. Generally, the remedial measures will include breaking the concrete and adding a pipe that vents radon gas out of the building. Price and type of remediation differs for every home. Again, if the results come back below 200 Bq/m3, you have the option of whether or not you choose to mitigate.

When building a home you can also request the builder select a different option if you would prefer. The builder probably needs to know before permits are applied for as the rough in will be completed around the time the foundation is poured.

Radon Gas Soil Mitigation Construction Requirements

Due to recent findings from a study conducted by Kingston, Frontenac, Lennox and Addington (KFL&A) Public Health, the Town of Greater Napanee is implementing soil gas control measures in new construction and additions of low-rise residential buildings. This strategy applies to new building permits applied for after November 1, 2019.

Health Canada guidelines dictate that radon gas concentrations above 200 Becquerel’s per cubic metre (Bq/m3) require remediation. As such, this strategy requires soil gas control requirements as per the Ontario Building Code (OBC) subsection 9.13.4., and SB-9 (Requirements for Soil Gas Control). 

Construction Requirements

Building permit drawings shall clearly indicate details associated with one of the following three radon gas mitigation options to be constructed on site:

Option 1
1. A 100mm diameter PVC pipe rough-in through the floor slab adjacent an exterior wall connected to a corrugated plastic soil gas pipe extending under the slab and terminating at or near the center in conformance with Subsection 3.2, Sentences (1) through (5) of SB-9,
     a. Minimum 150mm granular material for a radius not less than 300mm centered on the pipe, with the bottom of the
     pipe open to the granular, and
     b. The upper end of the pipe shall be provided with a removable seal, and labeled to indicate for “soil gas removal
     only”.
2. Mandatory radon gas testing in conformance with Subsection 3.2, Sentence (6) of SB-9.

Please note: where concentration levels exceed 200 Bq/m3, a subsoil depressurization system is to be installed in conformance with Subsection 3.2, sentence (9) of SB-9.


Option 1: Sub-Slab depressurization rough-in

sub slab depressurization rough in

*Please note that we are working towards making our website images accessible.

 

Option 2
1. A soil gas barrier on the foundation walls (bituminous damp proofing) in conformance with Division B, 9.13.4.2 (3), and
2. under the basement floor slab using 6 mil polyethylene lapped not less than 300mm in conformance with Figures SB-9A or SB-9B of SB-9, and
3. sealing along the perimeter of the basement floor slab and at all penetrations using flexible sealant (polyurethane caulking) in conformance with Division B, 9.13.4.2.(4)(a) and SB-9.

Please note: spray foam can be substituted as a radon gas barrier under basement floor slabs where installed in conformance with CCMC Evaluation Report 14073-R.

 

Option 3
1. A soil gas barrier on the foundation walls (bituminous damp proofing) in conformance with Division B, Sentence 9.13.4.2 (3) and Figure SB-9A or SB-9B of SB-9.
2. Installation of a sub slab depressurization system installed in accordance with Health Canada guideline "Reducing Radon Levels in Existing Homes: A Canadian Guide for Professional Contractors".
     a. A properly labelled 100mm PVC pipe shall be installed through the floor slab adjacent an exterior wall connected to
     a corrugated plastic soil gas pipe extending under the slab into a centrally located 150mm thick bed of granular
     material. In accordance with Subsection 3.2, sentences (1) through (5) of SB-9, and
     b. Above the slab, 100mm grey PVC piping shall be installed, extending either through the roof or the rim joist, and
     shall have a continuous duty centrifugal inline radon fan.
Please note: where an ICF foundation is being used, and radon option 2 or 3 is chosen, replace “bituminous damp proofing” with “waterproofing membrane” approved for installation over ICF foundations.

Option 2 and 3: Damp Proofing and Soil Gas Control at floor and wall junctions

damp proofing and soil gas control and floor and wall junctions

SB-9A - Solid Wall                                 SB-9B - Hollow Wall

*Please note that we are working towards making our website images accessible.

Required Inspections

The owner of a property on which construction takes place or their authorized agent shall arrange for the following inspections:
1. The installation of the rough-in soil gas pipe, and granular material prior to pouring the basement slab,
2. The installation of soil gas barrier on foundation wall (bituminous damp proofing) and under floor slab (6 mil polyethylene) prior to covering or pouring the basement slab, and
3. Sealing of the perimeter of the slab adjacent to the foundation wall and any slab penetrations (polyurethane caulking) prior to covering.
4. Pipe cap and labelling, and inline fan (where required) prior to occupancy.

Testing

Depending on the radon gas mitigation option chosen by the builder, the building may be subject to mandatory radon gas testing.
It is the Owners responsibility to conduct the radon test to determine the radon concentration in the building and submit the results to the Greater Napanee’s Building Department.
All radon testing will consist of long-term tests (minimum 91 days) completed during the winter season, when windows and doors are generally closed, and are recommended to be carried out by a Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) certified professional.

Testing Results and Mitigation

The following is required where mandatory radon gas testing results come back over 200 Becquerel’s per cubic metre (Bq/m3):
1. The Owner is responsible for mitigation and installation of a subfloor depressurization system.
2. Measures shall be taken to ensure that any resultant decrease in soil temperature will not adversely affect the foundation, and documentation to this affect is to be provided by a qualified person.
After installation, the Owner is to submit testing results indicating levels below 200 Becquerel’s to Greater Napanee’s Building Department.
Health Canada recommends that you hire a professional certified under the Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) as lowering radon levels in a home requires specific technical knowledge and skills to ensure the job is done properly. To find a list of certified professionals contact the Canadian National Radon Proficiency Program (C-NRPP) at 1-855-722-6777.

Tarion Warranty

New homes in Ontario come with a new home warranty that is provided by your builder and backed by Tarion. This warranty also covers excessive radon gas levels in new homes for seven years from the date of occupancy.

 Soil Gas Mitigation Strategy Declaration Form 
 Soil Gas Mitigation Strategy Declaration Form 
Sign Permit 

You must fill out a Sign Permit Application (includes the Sign Bylaw) before doing any of the following:

  • Erect a sign (including mobile) 
Swimming Pool Permit 

You must fill out a Swimming Pool Permit Application (includes the Swimming Pool Bylaw) before doing any of the following:

  • Install an in-ground or above-ground swimming pool 
Sewage System Permits

For more information, please see our Septic and Wells page.

Additional Documents Required with a Building Permit Application
The documents listed below may pertain to your construction, and must be submitted along with your Application.

2 Sets of permit drawings completed by a qualified designer or owner include:

  • Floor Plans
  • Elevations
  • Wall Sections and Details
  • Structural Drawings (may require Professional Engineer Design)
  • Mechanical (HVAC and Plumbing)
  • Electrical (large scale projects)

When the building permit application is complete with all required items necessary have been submitted, the application is assigned to a Building Inspector. The application is then examined to ensure that it complies with the Ontario Building Code and any other applicable laws.

NOTE: Please submit all the required information (includes Building Permit Application and any additional documents) at the same time. If you do not submit all required materials, your application may be refused.

All construction must comply with zoning requirements, regardless of the need to obtain a building permit. (e.g. 90 sq.ft. building would still need to meet the minimum property setback requirement - Check with a Planning Clerk)

 Fees
 Development Charges 
 Please visit the Development Charges page.
 Building Fees
Building Fees
 Education Development Charges 

Education Development Charges Rate Schedule - Algonquin & Lakeshore Catholic District School Board

Lennox & Addington Education Development Charges By-Law 

 Sign Permit Fees
Sign Permit Fees

 

What can I build without a permit?
  • Construction of a building under 160 ft2 (15 m2), that does not qualify to be considered as a shed identified below. Such building however must also comply with zoning setbacks, lot coverage permissions and setbacks to sewage systems.
  • A shed that meets the below criteria, however must also comply with zoning setback, lot coverage permissions and setbacks to sewage systems:
    • is not more than 15 m2 in gross area;
    • is not more than one storey in building height;
    • is not attached to a building or any other structure;
    • is used only for storage purposes ancillary to a principal building on the lot; and
    • does not have plumbing.
  • Re-shingle a roof, provided there is no structural work
  • Paint or decorate
  • Reinstall/replace kitchen or bathroom cupboards without plumbing
  • Landscape or resurface/construct sidewalks and driveways
  • Replacing plumbing fixtures (plumbing locations are not being moved)
  • Construction of a tent not more than 60 square metres. Such tent cannot be attached to a building and must be located more than 3m from other structures
What type of Designer does my project need?

Under the Ontario Building Code, homeowners can design most projects for their own personal homes. Owners of rentals, commercial properties or other classifications must hire an appropriate designer or design team for their project. Should owners decide to design their own projects, they should have a solid concept of building construction.

Under the Ontario Building Code, building projects require qualified professional designers to take responsibility for their designs. Designers are responsible for meeting Ontario Building Code requirements and ensuring that all designs comply with all necessary regulations.

Designers are qualified by the Ministry of Housing and issued a Building Code Identification Number (BCIN). These designers are qualified only for the examinations that they have successfully completed.

Architects and Engineers are required for larger projects, construction outside the scope of the OBC, renovations and additions to larger buildings and certain occupancy classes.

Establishing a complete and qualified design team is crucial for ensuring the success of your project.

Documents or Links that may be helpful for your project:

 

Apply for a permit at Infrastructure Services, 45 Commercial Court.

 

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